And Then There Were None: Reviewed

I can’t say I really understand the resurgence of Agatha Christie, but she is coming back in a powerful fashion. Modern adaptations are trying to balance the camp of the older works with a darker, more realistic tone, and Rowan Wishart’s interpretation of And Then There Were None is a perfect example of this. It kept an even hand of fun and dark and managed to make a compelling, thrilling mystery out of an 80-year-old story. But there were technical inconsistencies throughout that kept it from being quite as exactly tuned as it could have been.

Preview: The Bacchae

The more ancient a play is, the more work must be done to make it relevant. This is the fundamental struggle that any director has working with Greek Tragedy today. Gabriele Uboldi seems relatively unfazed by the concept. To him, that difficulty of making that relevant is basically the central conceit of the entire show.

Blink: Reviewed

It’s odd to talk about this play because it is fundamentally very odd. Blink is, for better or for worse, a Wes Anderson movie taken to the stage. There’s an attention to detail here that reminds me of that director’s work, not to mention a lot of music ripped straight from Fantastic Mr. Fox and Moonrise Kingdom. Its tone is, for lack of a better word, decidedly quirky, reveling in its weirdness with a smile and a wink. But with all that entertaining goofiness, the show doesn’t let us sit with its heart enough to leave a major impact on the audience.

St Andrews Theatre: Semester Preview

The first week of this semester is about to come to an end, which means that the St Andrews performing arts semester is about to start. With Spark going up in week 3, I wanted to do a quick preview of the season and figure out what people were interested in. One of the theatre writers, Olli Gilford, wrote this piece below.

Charle Sinclair: Reviewed

Sitcoms are excellent. They’re silly, they’re clever, they’re funny and they make us smile a little bit when we feel less than perfect. Importantly, above all else, they are fun. As a lifelong fan of the show Scrubs, I couldn’t help but notice parallels between my favorite sitcom and the style of Charlie Sinclair. It’s irreverent, somewhat faux-intellectual, and has the potential to be as sugary as a powdered donut. And when it was like that, I found myself becoming a part of the laugh track. But Charlie Sinclair was not perfect, and while its highs were high, inconsistencies in the script and direction kept the show from its potential.

Black Box – Our Voter: Reviewed

Devising is an incredibly interesting concept. A troupe of actors working to create a piece of theatre has the potential to bring something new to the stage. This idea is at the core of Blackbox. Headed up by Oli 14117976_1813143562305418_5136833851662006883_nSavage, Blackbox is St Andrews’ first devising troupe, and though technically formed last year, this semester is the first time the troupe has staged a production. This past Monday was their first showcase of what they could do – the result? It’s a bit tough to describe.

Sacrifice: Reviewed

It is incredibly difficult to adapt a play out of its native language and culture. You have to inform the audience about thousands of years of customs and context in at most an 14856002_718059351675768_2539261522263581906_ohour and a half or, more often than not, much less. While the effort by Alberto Micheletti and his team to stage a performance of Rabindranath Tagore’s play Sacrifice was a bold and admirable choice, the production’s inconsistent tone and inability to convey its message effectively hampered the show from excelling.