Isle of Dogs: appropriation or appreciation?

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is set in the fictional town of Megasaki in a Japanese archipelago of the near future, where the outbreak of dog flu has led the dogs of the city to be quarantined on the abandoned Rubbish Island. But is the director’s latest release a celebratory homage to Japan or just another western-centric indulgence, utilising cultural stereotypes as a backdrop for his own ends?

A Quiet Place: what everyone’s been shouting about

As a great lover of horror movies, it was with a jolt that I realised that A Quiet Place is the first horror movie I have seen in the cinema. And at first, I thought I’d made a huge mistake: the cinema was crawling with people. And this was supposed to be a film watched in silence, I was well aware. Perhaps I should have waited for it to come out on Netflix. I love horror. In the least pretentious way possible, I want a pure experience of a movie.

The Colors of Disney: an interview with Anna Tantillo

Anna Tantillo, a 2017 graduate of University of St Andrews, recently started her own creative Instagram account, @disneycolorpalettes, and all while studying for her master’s degree! I got the chance to interview her on why she chose to start this account and received some tips on how we could start our own too.

The List: Top 5 Anti-Valentine’s Movies

This is the B side of the Top 5 Valentine’s Day movies. From the wonderfully frightening to the frighteningly bad, this list has everything you need to get you through the dreaded February 14th. Hard-boiled house pets, Brad Pitt’s abs, the never-ending question of how Zooey Deschanel’s fringe stays so perfectly in place – each of these movies has more than enough to distract you from any Valentine’s blues you may have.

The List: Top 5 Valentine’s Day Movies

Whether you’re in love, out of love, hate love, love love – we can all appreciate a decent romantic movie. From the tragic to the hilarious, this list of Top 5 Valentine’s Day movies has everything you need to live vicariously through couples with more exciting lives than you. Alternatively, you can check out our Top 5 Anti-Valentine’s movies in case you need reminding that love isn’t always the be-all and end-all.

 

The Greatest Showman: not so great?

After the immense success of La La Land, it is no surprise that movie musicals are making a comeback. This year, the genre has climbed to even greater heights with The Greatest Showman, starring Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, and Zac Efron. Jackman has supposedly been pushing this project for a few years now, and finally got the team to make it happen. The screenplay is by Bill Condon, who wrote for the film adaptations of both Chicago and Dreamgirls. Benj Pasek and Justin Paul of La La Land acclaim also wrote songs for the film.

Fifty Shades Darker: Reviewed

Once again, Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson unite on-screen for the sequel to one of 2015’s most anticipated movies. The Fifty Shades of Grey series by E.L. James captured millions with its steamy sex scenes and enticing Mr. Grey, quickly becoming one of literature’s all-time best sellers. The erotic novels have become a guilty pleasure of many; however, translating from page to screen has shown to lose some of its appeal.

Film: The Danish Girl Reviewed

A portrayal of a transgender life in the late 1920s and early 1930s is inevitably going to be wrought with emotional and physical tensions, tensions which Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander display with grit and purposefulness. With their intense love and physical attraction comes a deep friendship which sees Gerda (Vikander) persuade Einar (Redmayne) to model for a beautiful painting of ballet dancer Ulla, their friend played by Amber Heard (Pineapple Express, 2008; Paranoia, 2013), who can’t make it to the sitting. Delicate filming ensues; Redmayne draws silk stocking over his legs, caressing them with whimsical fascination, and clumsily wriggles his feet into a pair of ivory slippers, Gerda giggling in the background. At this point, it seems to be a game, a necessity called for by the nature of Gerda’s job that sees the gradual development of Lili into a very real, dramatic presence.