The List: Top 5 Anti-Valentine’s Movies

This is the B side of the Top 5 Valentine’s Day movies. From the wonderfully frightening to the frighteningly bad, this list has everything you need to get you through the dreaded February 14th. Hard-boiled house pets, Brad Pitt’s abs, the never-ending question of how Zooey Deschanel’s fringe stays so perfectly in place – each of these movies has more than enough to distract you from any Valentine’s blues you may have.

The List: Top 5 Valentine’s Day Movies

Whether you’re in love, out of love, hate love, love love – we can all appreciate a decent romantic movie. From the tragic to the hilarious, this list of Top 5 Valentine’s Day movies has everything you need to live vicariously through couples with more exciting lives than you. Alternatively, you can check out our Top 5 Anti-Valentine’s movies in case you need reminding that love isn’t always the be-all and end-all.

 

The Greatest Showman: not so great?

After the immense success of La La Land, it is no surprise that movie musicals are making a comeback. This year, the genre has climbed to even greater heights with The Greatest Showman, starring Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, and Zac Efron. Jackman has supposedly been pushing this project for a few years now, and finally got the team to make it happen. The screenplay is by Bill Condon, who wrote for the film adaptations of both Chicago and Dreamgirls. Benj Pasek and Justin Paul of La La Land acclaim also wrote songs for the film.

Fifty Shades Darker: Reviewed

Once again, Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson unite on-screen for the sequel to one of 2015’s most anticipated movies. The Fifty Shades of Grey series by E.L. James captured millions with its steamy sex scenes and enticing Mr. Grey, quickly becoming one of literature’s all-time best sellers. The erotic novels have become a guilty pleasure of many; however, translating from page to screen has shown to lose some of its appeal.

Film: The Danish Girl Reviewed

A portrayal of a transgender life in the late 1920s and early 1930s is inevitably going to be wrought with emotional and physical tensions, tensions which Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander display with grit and purposefulness. With their intense love and physical attraction comes a deep friendship which sees Gerda (Vikander) persuade Einar (Redmayne) to model for a beautiful painting of ballet dancer Ulla, their friend played by Amber Heard (Pineapple Express, 2008; Paranoia, 2013), who can’t make it to the sitting. Delicate filming ensues; Redmayne draws silk stocking over his legs, caressing them with whimsical fascination, and clumsily wriggles his feet into a pair of ivory slippers, Gerda giggling in the background. At this point, it seems to be a game, a necessity called for by the nature of Gerda’s job that sees the gradual development of Lili into a very real, dramatic presence.

The Playlist: Week Eight

If the arrival of week eight seems daunting, here’s a playlist to get you through the influx of work. This Tuesday the Vic plays host to the launch of 602 and the uni’s extended birthday with a special gin cocktail on offer and DJ Asquire, its the perfect mid-week celebration. If you’re feeling the Halloween blues, the book of choice this week ‘The Making of Zombie Wars’ by Aleksander Hemon should cheer you up. The comic book follows an aspiring writer of a script titled Zombie Wars as he engages in an affair and feels the consequences which seem to follow his own script. Released this Friday, ‘Kill Your Friends’ is a similar mix of comedy and outright killing. Set in the music industry of London 1997, the film follows Steven Stelfox (Nicholas Hoult) as he sacrifices his friends for his career with a great soundtrack and cast the films set to be a cult classic. Following a similar theme this weeks student-written play, ‘An Impromptu Performance’, follows a group of naive criminals who try and rob a drug baron. Whereas if ‘Ghost’ with Patrick Swayze is more your thing, check out The Great Pottery Throw Down on BBC2 this week. While it is yet another spin-off of the Great British franchise, the show promises some great art that reduces the judges to tears.

A Halloween Night In

Preparing for Halloween and want to be in a spooky mood? Not really up for having a night out and just want to stay in on Halloween? Trying to justify the amount of procrastination you’re doing by watching Netflix? Grab your laptop and a bag of popcorn and turn down the lights to celebrate this creepy holiday!

The Playlist: Week Seven

It’s week seven and time to dust off your dust sheets with Halloween on the horizon. Bond is back this week as Craig graces our screens once more in ‘Spectre’. While Sam Smith’s theme might leave a lot to be desired, the new 007 film is set to meet the high standards of its predecessor ‘Skyfall’. Also, returning to the screen is British favourites Ian McKellen and Anthony Hopkins in the BBC TV adaptation of Ronald Harwood’s play ‘The Dresser’. ‘The Dresser’ centres on the head of a Shakespearean theatre company (Hopkins) and his stage hand (McKellen) as they struggle to perform King Lear during the worst days of the Blitz in WW2. Back for another instalment is the Live Lounge hosted by Music is Love and STAR with a line-up of student musicians to enjoy with a coffee in Rectors this Thursday. New to the Barron is student-written play ‘Miracle Material’ which tells the story of Nat caught in a media storm and storm of different opinions after a freak accident. Also new this week is Colum McCann’s collection of short stories ‘Thirteen Ways of Looking’. Each of the three stories focuses on time in the present, memory and in anticipation through a missing child, a struggling writer and a nun suffering from dementia.