Closer: Reviewed

Closer by Patrick Marber is a play about the emotional distance that can occur in relationships and the restless neediness of love, following the interweaving and interrelating lives of four characters.

Birds: Reviewed

I first encountered Birds in a classics module during my first semester at St. Andrews. After reading it, I remember thinking: what a shame such a delightful play is so utterly and completely unperformable. So, needless to say, I wasn’t going to miss this production. I wanted to see how it would overcome the two main challenges of the play: that half the characters are birds, and half the action takes place in the sky.

The Cripple of Inishmaan: Reviewed

Anyone who knows me will tell you that my favorite writer is Martin McDonagh. There’s something about his scripts, the weirdness, the darkness, and the absolutely bonkers humor, that speaks to me. That being said, I never really liked Cripple of Inishmaan. It’s a good script, but it seemed to lack a lot of the energy that made McDonagh as a writer click – it was slow and standard, rather than his usual eclectic style. That is, until Saturday, when I saw it for myself. The Cripple of Inishmaan made me smile more than any play has in a very long time, and while it may have been lower energy than McDonagh’s other scripts, it was no less of a riotously fun time.

The Great Gatsby: Preview

If you’ve ever taken an English class, or been to a vaguely themed party in the past few years, chances are you’ve heard of The Great Gatsby. Even this magazine takes its name from a Great Gatsby character. F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel about wealth and love in the roaring 20s is infamous, and St Andrews is seeing its own adaptation coming to the Stage this week. Owl Eyes sat down with the Director, Madison Hauser, to ask a few questions about how to manage a party quite so big.

The History Boys: Reviewed

The History Boys is the nation’s favorite play, and I can absolutely understand why. It’s funny, irreverent, ultimately heartwarming, and it provides a positive view of an experience almost every briton has had. I had a teacher like Hector myself, sans-abuse, and I know the positive impact a person like that can have. And this production brought a lot of that emotion that I know too well. But the energy that makes those moments, and this play, special, wasn’t there, and that lethargy, unfortunately, brought the play down from its peak.

Mermaids Christmas Ball 2017: Reviewed

Twinkling lights, rousing live music and a sea of jewel-tone clad revellers: these are some freeze-frames of the 2017 Mermaids Christmas Ball. Rarely an event that disappoints, this year was no exception as Kinkell Byre was transformed into a Fairytale of New York.  Unlike previous years’ themes this year was not modelled after a film, the committee choosing instead to create a glitzy winter wonderland complete with motifs of the city decorating the space. The New York skyline adorned one wall and recognisable street signs dotted the venue, with miles of fairy lights interwoven between.

Preview: The Bacchae

The more ancient a play is, the more work must be done to make it relevant. This is the fundamental struggle that any director has working with Greek Tragedy today. Gabriele Uboldi seems relatively unfazed by the concept. To him, that difficulty of making that relevant is basically the central conceit of the entire show.

Reviewed: Anything Goes

Some shows don’t revive well.
The Just So Society, having finally ceded to pressure to programme classic musicals, may have hit a bum note in choosing Anything Goes – an immensely talented cast, some gaffs, and some great musical numbers do little to cover the frankly bald excuse for a script and the racial attitudes central to parts of the plot (centering around converting Chinese men to Christianity).

The Pillowman: Reviewed

Martin McDonagh’s black comedy ‘The Pillowman’ saw the directorial debut of Mermaids regular Miles Hurley. It was the story of Katurian, a fiction writer living in a totalitarian state, brought in for interrogation about the gruesome content of his short stories and their similarities to a number of graphic child murders occurring in his town.