Isle of Dogs: appropriation or appreciation?

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is set in the fictional town of Megasaki in a Japanese archipelago of the near future, where the outbreak of dog flu has led the dogs of the city to be quarantined on the abandoned Rubbish Island. But is the director’s latest release a celebratory homage to Japan or just another western-centric indulgence, utilising cultural stereotypes as a backdrop for his own ends?

A Quiet Place: what everyone’s been shouting about

As a great lover of horror movies, it was with a jolt that I realised that A Quiet Place is the first horror movie I have seen in the cinema. And at first, I thought I’d made a huge mistake: the cinema was crawling with people. And this was supposed to be a film watched in silence, I was well aware. Perhaps I should have waited for it to come out on Netflix. I love horror. In the least pretentious way possible, I want a pure experience of a movie.

The Physicists/Die Physiker: Reviewed

Don’t be misled by this play’s title; it deals with much more than physics or physicists. The show was performed in its original German (a delight as a mother-tongue German speaker) with English subtitles. Dürrenmatt’s dark absurdist comedy tackles the ethics and structures of science, madness and power. In the Director’s Note, the directors acknowledge the challenge in staging this “fiercely moral yet absurdist piece” and bringing it into the 21st century, a challenge they wonderfully mastered.

The Greatest Showman: not so great?

After the immense success of La La Land, it is no surprise that movie musicals are making a comeback. This year, the genre has climbed to even greater heights with The Greatest Showman, starring Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, and Zac Efron. Jackman has supposedly been pushing this project for a few years now, and finally got the team to make it happen. The screenplay is by Bill Condon, who wrote for the film adaptations of both Chicago and Dreamgirls. Benj Pasek and Justin Paul of La La Land acclaim also wrote songs for the film.

No Questions Asked: Reviewed

Student writing and science fiction are two things which are often underrepresented in St Andrews. A student-written science fiction show? Now that’s something we really don’t get a lot of.

One to Watch: Mindhunter

With the vast quantity of material that online streaming giant Netflix is churning out on a somewhat weekly basis, it is becoming a struggle to sieve the weak from the strong. Deciding on something to watch has become like looking for a needle in a haystack. However there are, on occasion, shows or films that deserve a special mention, and Mindhunter, based on the best selling non-fiction novel, is a series that cannot escape such recognition. The show sports many of the themes that are currently so popular: the retro nostalgia of the 1970s, the preoccupation with psychology, and, particularly at this time of year, the thrill of the unknown. Mindhunter ticks all these boxes and more.

St Andrews Charity Polo Tournament: Reviewed

As we are now well into the season of spring, the St Andrews Polo Club held their annual Charity Polo Match this past Saturday. The event, held on Errol Park Estate, was a perfect escape from the bubble and a good way to celebrate the end of coursework deadlines. I have not been to a polo match before; however, after hearing great things of the last few tournaments I thought I would give it a shot. I can honestly say I have never been to or experienced an event like it.

Fifty Shades Darker: Reviewed

Once again, Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson unite on-screen for the sequel to one of 2015’s most anticipated movies. The Fifty Shades of Grey series by E.L. James captured millions with its steamy sex scenes and enticing Mr. Grey, quickly becoming one of literature’s all-time best sellers. The erotic novels have become a guilty pleasure of many; however, translating from page to screen has shown to lose some of its appeal.

The xx’s I See You: Reviewed

After years of silence, The xx are back with ten fresh new tracks in their third studio album, I See You. The band – comprised of lead vocalist and guitarist Romy Madley Croft, bassist Oliver Sim, and percussionist Jamie “xx” Smith – have released tour dates for the album, several of which sold out in minutes. I See You’s release has been both highly demanded and anticipated. Now, it is here, and it is genuinely stunning.