No Questions Asked: Reviewed

Student writing and science fiction are two things which are often underrepresented in St Andrews. A student-written science fiction show? Now that’s something we really don’t get a lot of.

One to Watch: Mindhunter

With the vast quantity of material that online streaming giant Netflix is churning out on a somewhat weekly basis, it is becoming a struggle to sieve the weak from the strong. Deciding on something to watch has become like looking for a needle in a haystack. However there are, on occasion, shows or films that deserve a special mention, and Mindhunter, based on the best selling non-fiction novel, is a series that cannot escape such recognition. The show sports many of the themes that are currently so popular: the retro nostalgia of the 1970s, the preoccupation with psychology, and, particularly at this time of year, the thrill of the unknown. Mindhunter ticks all these boxes and more.

St Andrews Charity Polo Tournament: Reviewed

As we are now well into the season of spring, the St Andrews Polo Club held their annual Charity Polo Match this past Saturday. The event, held on Errol Park Estate, was a perfect escape from the bubble and a good way to celebrate the end of coursework deadlines. I have not been to a polo match before; however, after hearing great things of the last few tournaments I thought I would give it a shot. I can honestly say I have never been to or experienced an event like it.

Fifty Shades Darker: Reviewed

Once again, Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson unite on-screen for the sequel to one of 2015’s most anticipated movies. The Fifty Shades of Grey series by E.L. James captured millions with its steamy sex scenes and enticing Mr. Grey, quickly becoming one of literature’s all-time best sellers. The erotic novels have become a guilty pleasure of many; however, translating from page to screen has shown to lose some of its appeal.

The xx’s I See You: Reviewed

After years of silence, The xx are back with ten fresh new tracks in their third studio album, I See You. The band – comprised of lead vocalist and guitarist Romy Madley Croft, bassist Oliver Sim, and percussionist Jamie “xx” Smith – have released tour dates for the album, several of which sold out in minutes. I See You’s release has been both highly demanded and anticipated. Now, it is here, and it is genuinely stunning.

Christmas Ball 2016: Reviewed

There is a particular frisson to the Mermaids Christmas Ball that you either love or hate— and, generally, people belonging to the latter party are people who have cold memories of sitting in the rain at 3am. Thankfully they made the decision to move to online ticket sales which, while causing a lot of controversy, meant there weren’t students dying of hypothermia clogging up the streets in the early hours of a Scottish winter morning. In a St Andrews with events failing left, right and centre, Christmas Ball will never not sell out; something the Mermaids are right to be thrilled with, as it enables them to take shows to the Fringe every summer in the name of #art.

Szentek: Reviewed

Not knowing what to expect from Szentek, Thursday night had me trying on – and subsequently rejecting – every outfit in my wardrobe. As it turns out, I needn’t have worried. Upon arriving, it quickly became clear that I wasn’t the only one who was uncertain as to the dress code. Guests were wearing everything from glitter covered jumpsuits with skyscraper heels to cut offs, neon face paint and trainers. Bizarrely though, it all seemed to work. Even the dressiest outfit did not seem out of place against the venue’s aesthetic, and the atmosphere was far from self conscious.

Bindi: Reviewed

Hosted by Sanskriti, the University’s South Asian society, Bindi promised a night of music, drinks and dancing, and it certainly did not disappoint. Starting as they meant to go on, guests flocked to the dance floor the moment the DJ began his set. The music was an eclectic mix of Bollywood and Bhangra, creating an upbeat and lively vibe that ensured it was the standout feature of the night. The committee had even sourced a dholi for the occasion, a traditional Punjabi drummer. This added another dimension to the music, and really brought the party to life. Trust me when I say it’s impossible not to dance along to the rhythm of a dhol.

The Girl on the Train reviewed: did it live up to the book?

As an avid movie-goer and psychological-thriller fanatic, I was incredibly excited to find out that Paula Hawkins’s The Girl on the Train was being adapted into a film. Told from the perspective of Rachel Watson (Emily Blunt), Megan Hipwell (Haley Bennett), and Anna Watson (Rebecca Ferguson), the voices of these three women are woven together to create a complex and disturbingly brilliant masterpiece.