Welly Ball 2018: Reviewed

While ‘The Challenge’ may sound like a cringey 5pm game show, it is actually an annual November shooting competition that brings over 140 shots from universities around the country to East Fife. Some might see the Welly Ball that follows as a quintessentially St Andrews event – playing host to thousands of students in ball gowns, tweed, and most importantly, wellies – but it remains one of the few cross-university events that the town hosts, with attendees from as far as Exeter. The Clay Pigeon Shooting Club somehow manages a finely-tuned schedule starting with a day for the shots and then followed by a ball for both Dinner and After Party guests, greatly to their credit. Welly 2018, though not without its detractions, was yet again a fun experience, with the proceeds going to a great cause. Plus, it had the added bonus of Wellington boots as a barrier both to the usual mud, and toe-stepping revelry of Kinkell.

(Not so) Sorry to Bother You

I’ve already annoyed all of my friends by speaking about how much I love the film Sorry to Bother You; the only outlet I have left by which to communicate my feelings is to strangers on the internet.  Sorry to Bother You is a masterpiece of modern cinema, and I paid to see it three times after its American release in July.  Its UK release is scheduled for December of this year, and I’ve already made plans to see it in theaters once again.  While this approach may seem dumb to some people (read: my dad), Sorry to Bother You is truly a priceless film experience, even after already seeing it three times.

From the Anonymous to the Zorro – Concrete Catwalk turns 4

A night of masked entertainment, with cocktails flowing, in St Andrews? Surprising. While it may sound like it, no, it’s not a resurgence of sports club initiations or Bullingdon Club-esque debauchery, but the 4th birthday of Concrete Catwalk St Andrews. Held at The Adamson on the 30thOctober, the eclectic street style blog that captures library looks fresh off the pages of Vogue hosted a wonderful evening of masked revelry.

St Andrews Waffle Co.’s ‘Grab-N-Go’ Extension: Reviewed

Built on the former site of Mr Milano, the Grab-N-Go takeaway can be considered a spiritual successor to the former fry shop. Unlike its predecessor however, the Waffle Co’s newest addition has a plethora of options that include hot dogs, veggie burgers and truffle (yes truffle) pizza. In keeping with their waffle origins, the main dessert offering is the Hong Kong-style ‘Bubble Waffle’. As a Hong Kong resident and consistent consumer of said dessert, I was happy to hear that the recipe for the waffle was created by a Hong Kong-local based in Canada.

Isle of Dogs: appropriation or appreciation?

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is set in the fictional town of Megasaki in a Japanese archipelago of the near future, where the outbreak of dog flu has led the dogs of the city to be quarantined on the abandoned Rubbish Island. But is the director’s latest release a celebratory homage to Japan or just another western-centric indulgence, utilising cultural stereotypes as a backdrop for his own ends?

A Quiet Place: what everyone’s been shouting about

As a great lover of horror movies, it was with a jolt that I realised that A Quiet Place is the first horror movie I have seen in the cinema. And at first, I thought I’d made a huge mistake: the cinema was crawling with people. And this was supposed to be a film watched in silence, I was well aware. Perhaps I should have waited for it to come out on Netflix. I love horror. In the least pretentious way possible, I want a pure experience of a movie.

The Physicists/Die Physiker: Reviewed

Don’t be misled by this play’s title; it deals with much more than physics or physicists. The show was performed in its original German (a delight as a mother-tongue German speaker) with English subtitles. Dürrenmatt’s dark absurdist comedy tackles the ethics and structures of science, madness and power. In the Director’s Note, the directors acknowledge the challenge in staging this “fiercely moral yet absurdist piece” and bringing it into the 21st century, a challenge they wonderfully mastered.

The Greatest Showman: not so great?

After the immense success of La La Land, it is no surprise that movie musicals are making a comeback. This year, the genre has climbed to even greater heights with The Greatest Showman, starring Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, and Zac Efron. Jackman has supposedly been pushing this project for a few years now, and finally got the team to make it happen. The screenplay is by Bill Condon, who wrote for the film adaptations of both Chicago and Dreamgirls. Benj Pasek and Justin Paul of La La Land acclaim also wrote songs for the film.

No Questions Asked: Reviewed

Student writing and science fiction are two things which are often underrepresented in St Andrews. A student-written science fiction show? Now that’s something we really don’t get a lot of.

One to Watch: Mindhunter

With the vast quantity of material that online streaming giant Netflix is churning out on a somewhat weekly basis, it is becoming a struggle to sieve the weak from the strong. Deciding on something to watch has become like looking for a needle in a haystack. However there are, on occasion, shows or films that deserve a special mention, and Mindhunter, based on the best selling non-fiction novel, is a series that cannot escape such recognition. The show sports many of the themes that are currently so popular: the retro nostalgia of the 1970s, the preoccupation with psychology, and, particularly at this time of year, the thrill of the unknown. Mindhunter ticks all these boxes and more.