UBUNTU 2019: REVIEWED

Looking around the room, one could feel the celebration of African culture at the second annual fashion showcase, Ubuntu. Guests followed the dress code of “regally bold,” wearing bright blues and purples and bold prints representing the styles of countries throughout Africa. The St Andrews Afro-Caribbean Society hosted and honed in on all the details, decking out the Stage in colourful patterns as guests were greeted with tables covered in the beautiful designs that they were encouraged to wear.

King Lear: Reviewed

I had very little idea what to expect from Director Hannah Ritchie’s all-female production of King Lear.  It represents her first directing project in St Andrews, and features a cast of proven talent and some new faces. The play is generally considered one of Shakespeare’s finest, but it is also notoriously difficult to stage. It’s very long (uncut it can run as long as four hours), deals with incredibly complex themes, and the role of Lear itself is a challenge even to veteran Shakespearean actors, often seen as the Everest of theatre. With these factors in mind, I was curious to see how well a group of young women could pull this off.

Romeo and Juliet: Reviewed

Because of the show’s emphasis on audience choice, Owl Eyes has chosen to send two reviewers to capture different experiences of the show. Each review will have its own rating.

Cock: Reviewed

Commenting on society’s unnatural desire to categorise sexuality instead of accepting its apparent fluidity, while exploring the struggle to know oneself in a world obsessed with labels, the recent Wanton Theatre and Saints LGBT+ production of Cock was a resounding success. Revolving around the conflict that arises when its central character, John (Tom Giles), is torn between his long time boyfriend (Angus Russell) and a new, female, romantic interest (Anoushka Kohli), Cock proved to be a brilliantly fast-paced and witty show driven by complex characters.

The Real Thing: Reviewed

The Real Thing is not Tom Stoppard at his finest. It meanders, it’s too long, makes its points too loudly, and to be honest by the time the last half of act two rolled around I really had no time for any of the characters. One gets the sense that we’re supposed to find these people charming, but their affluence and pretentious musings on the nature of love just came across as arrogant. But perhaps that’s the point.

Constellations: Interview

Nick Payne’s Constellations goes up in the Stage this week, so I sat down with director Al Gillespie and actors Kate Kitchens (Marianne) and Jared Liebmiller (Roland) to chat about the show.