Closer: Reviewed

Closer by Patrick Marber is a play about the emotional distance that can occur in relationships and the restless neediness of love, following the interweaving and interrelating lives of four characters.

Birds: Reviewed

I first encountered Birds in a classics module during my first semester at St. Andrews. After reading it, I remember thinking: what a shame such a delightful play is so utterly and completely unperformable. So, needless to say, I wasn’t going to miss this production. I wanted to see how it would overcome the two main challenges of the play: that half the characters are birds, and half the action takes place in the sky.

The Glass Menagerie: Reviewed

The Byre is a demanding space to work in; the rigors of working in a theatre with such little get-in time cannot be understated. But those rigors cannot and should not define the space within it, which is why it troubles me to see, after a string of inventive and clever manipulations, a show misuse the space so dramatically. Glass Menagerie’s issues lie in its production, with a design that does not use the space effectively and staging that keeps the show’s strong points hidden. And while the acting is strong, it simply didn’t have the room to breathe, preventing the show from being anything more than average.

Till Death Do Them Part: Reviewed

Cocktail dress on, champagne drunk, 3 course Hotel Du Vin meal enjoyed – I cannot deny that my evening was well spent at Till Death Do Them Part: the Fine Food and Dining Society’s immersive murder mystery dinner. The evening’s success rested heavily on the improvisation skills of the 6 main actors – Molly Williams, Caelan Mitchell-Bennett, Minoli de Silva, Bennett Hunecke, Kate Stamoulis and Sasha Gisbourne (aided by photographers, wedding planners and hotel staff who were indispensable to the immersion – in particular Mary Byrne, the ‘host from the hotel’, did such a great job that I thought she worked for Hotel Du Vin until she was presented with flowers at the end of the night!). We were first welcomed into a reception chamber in which the actors slowly began to mingle with the assembled guests. Special mention must be made of Williams and Mitchell-Bennett who adeptly dealt with every single question thrown at them, providing seamless characterisation. The atmosphere was warm and the excitement tangible (I heard many a whisper of “he/she’s gonna die, I bet you”). Sure enough, as the Bride and Groom toasted to the occasion, the latter bent double in a realistic choking fit and we were all shepherded desperately out of the reception room and through to the dining room, accompanied by promises of “yes, I’ll call the police in a minute”.

Rabbit Hole: Reviewed

Rabbit Hole, Mermaids’ first StAge show of the semester, was a testament to the virtue of simplicity. Director Emma Gylling Mortensen has produced a play that is very clearly a passion project, and her affection for the text was made obvious by creative decisions – from the staging, to a lavishly detailed set, not to mention an inspired playlist – that demonstrated a commitment to utter precision.

Antigone: Reviewed

Mermaids’ production of Antigone, directed by Greta Kelly and Lorna Govan, is a well thought-through reading of the famous Greek tragedy. The direction was faithful to the text and successfully conveyed Sophocles’ adaptation of the ancient myth, thanks to striking performances from the entire cast. This same faithfulness to the text, however, fails to make the themes of the tragedy relevant to a contemporary audience, which ultimately undermines the power of the production.

OTR Death in the Quad: A Preview

Have you ever read an Agatha Christie novel and wished that you could have lived through it in real life? Have you always thought that, had you been there, you would have known whodunnit? Well, the opportunity to live this dream is closer than you think…

Tales of Our World: Reviewed

For their first production of the new academic year, Mermaids presented us with something a bit different from its usual fare. Tales of our World promised an evening of intimate performance storytelling, bringing together the voices of the past and present in monologues “encompassing the scope of human narratives.”

The Great Gatsby: Preview

If you’ve ever taken an English class, or been to a vaguely themed party in the past few years, chances are you’ve heard of The Great Gatsby. Even this magazine takes its name from a Great Gatsby character. F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel about wealth and love in the roaring 20s is infamous, and St Andrews is seeing its own adaptation coming to the Stage this week. Owl Eyes sat down with the Director, Madison Hauser, to ask a few questions about how to manage a party quite so big.

“Because It’s Different”: A Lobes Preview

According to Oli Savage, it’s a cursed week. His actor was late to rehearsal. The room he walked into was cluttered with scones, tea, and more chairs than you could possibly guess. By his own admissions, his hands are covered in blisters after trying to work on his van over the weekend. But for a man with a curse, Oli Savage is surprisingly chipper. Not surprising, given that he’s got, as far as I’m aware, 2 projects on the go, not to mention being on OTR committee, teching for the Revue, being in a band and running his own theatre company. With that much on, being anything other than chipper is just admitting defeat.