Rome: A Love Letter to the Roman Architectural Colour Palette

Roma, Roma, Roma. I hardly spent enough time (roughly 36 hours) in Roma to write a piece that does it any justice whatsoever. Roma has inspired a plethora of writers, architects, artists, philosophers, politicians, historians and poets for hundreds and hundreds of years; to think I could produce any form of insightful commentary, thoughts or even capture a worthwhile picture of such a grand city is an insult.

There is a word for this feeling: vemödalen:

“N. THE FRUSTRATION OF PHOTOGRAPHING SOMETHING AMAZING WHEN THOUSANDS OF IDENTICAL PHOTOS ALREADY EXISTTHE SAME SUNSET, THE SAME WATERFALL, THE SAME CURVE OF A HIP, THE SAME CLOSEUP OF AN EYEWHICH CAN TURN A UNIQUE SUBJECT INTO SOMETHING HOLLOW AND PULPY AND CHEAP, LIKE A MASS-PRODUCED PIECE OF FURNITURE YOU HAPPEN TO HAVE ASSEMBLED YOURSELF.”— The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows .com

While wandering the streets of Rome on an unfortunately grey, humid, August afternoon, feeling unfortunately grey and irritable myself, I found myself unsurprisingly inspired and romanced by the city; vemödalen did not stop me from using up all my phone storage space on documenting one building alone, and I just like any other romantic was not immune to Roma’s charm.

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What I can offer however, are the photos that won’t make it to the first page of google images, and draw more attention to one of the most identifiable characteristics of Roman architecture apart from domes and arches: the browns and the creams.  It’s all too easy to be completely won over by the Roman colour palette. Rustic oranges, pops of pink and pastel blues take turns dancing across the cityscape. The city embraces the homogeneity of browns and creams in a paradoxical way that in turn makes it unique. I couldn’t tell you where in Rome these buildings in the photographs are or what they are there for but I felt compelled to capture each one, on every street and around every corner.

Rome is on any tourist and traveller’s bucket list (and believe me the city is overrun with them in the summer), but for good reason. Even if you don’t visit a single monument or museum, just going for a walk in a city like Rome can light up stars in your eyes.

These first few photos were taken in the square (and also from within) The Pantheon, a beautiful exhibit of ancient Roman architecture. (The rest, I’m not too sure, but probably not far from the Pantheon).static1.squarespace-1static1.squarespace-4IMG_2402 IMG_2419 IMG_2420 IMG_2223

 

 

 

 

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