Beauty and the Beast: Reviewed

Beauty and the Beast, starring Emma Watson and Dan Stevens, is Disney’s latest addition to their live-action collection of classic fairytales. Director Bill Condon creates an enchanting rendition of the 1991 animation and transforms a ‘tale as old as time’ into a more cohesive musical, whilst keeping the integrity of the original. With a juxtaposition between faithful reiterations that strike our nostalgia as well as new, modernised adventures, audiences see a revived storyline that is still faithful to the beloved classic.

Romeo and Juliet: Reviewed

Because of the show’s emphasis on audience choice, Owl Eyes has chosen to send two reviewers to capture different experiences of the show. Each review will have its own rating.

Charle Sinclair: Reviewed

Sitcoms are excellent. They’re silly, they’re clever, they’re funny and they make us smile a little bit when we feel less than perfect. Importantly, above all else, they are fun. As a lifelong fan of the show Scrubs, I couldn’t help but notice parallels between my favorite sitcom and the style of Charlie Sinclair. It’s irreverent, somewhat faux-intellectual, and has the potential to be as sugary as a powdered donut. And when it was like that, I found myself becoming a part of the laugh track. But Charlie Sinclair was not perfect, and while its highs were high, inconsistencies in the script and direction kept the show from its potential.

Semele: Reviewed

Semele, George Frideric Handel’s little known baroque piece, was given a modern twist by St Andrew’s Opera Society in a 1920s retelling of the classic myth at the Byre Theatre on the 27th and 28th February.

Spike Heels: Reviewed

Theresa Rebeck’s Spike Heels went up in the Barron theatre on the 17th and 18th of March without the audience it deserved. Notable for the way in which it handles the issue of sexual harassment alongside its comic underpinnings, the show was definitely a tough sell. Yet, director Addie Gray deftly navigated these issues of workplace harassment and sexual politics, even if she couldn’t avoid the show’s rather divisive ending.

Cock: Reviewed

Commenting on society’s unnatural desire to categorise sexuality instead of accepting its apparent fluidity, while exploring the struggle to know oneself in a world obsessed with labels, the recent Wanton Theatre and Saints LGBT+ production of Cock was a resounding success. Revolving around the conflict that arises when its central character, John (Tom Giles), is torn between his long time boyfriend (Angus Russell) and a new, female, romantic interest (Anoushka Kohli), Cock proved to be a brilliantly fast-paced and witty show driven by complex characters.