Read It Again: Arthur Golden’s Memoirs of a Geisha

There have been few books that I have read and re-read with every passing year and Arthur Golden’s Memoirs of a Geisha consistently makes the list. As the world changes around me, so does my interpretation of the book each time I come across it – yet it remains a literary masterpiece, sliding back the doors to tea houses, their ceremonies and most importantly to the life of geisha.

The List: 5 Cosy Autumn Reads

Though the days are creeping shorter, it isn’t winter yet. But it is autumn and autumn is the season when it gets windy, rainy and you want to do anything but study – so it’s also the perfect season to catch up on a bit of reading. Not the reading we’re all so bored of, of essays and papers and textbooks. Of books. Real books. It’s the perfect season to put on your pjs and snuggle up in bed, maybe even with a mug of hot chocolate, and definitely with an old paperback. Here are five cosy autumn reads to help you through those cold days.

On the Rocks Event Applications: Due 19th November

An art historian could quote you an essay by Harold Rosenberg. A budding philosopher could counter with a line from Plato’s Aesthetics. And who can say that one is right and one is wrong? Art—something that is simultaneously obvious and indefinable—connotes a different meaning to each who considers it. And as the deadline for applying to On The Rocks 2018 approaches, it is an idea you should consider in earnest.

Blink: Reviewed

It’s odd to talk about this play because it is fundamentally very odd. Blink is, for better or for worse, a Wes Anderson movie taken to the stage. There’s an attention to detail here that reminds me of that director’s work, not to mention a lot of music ripped straight from Fantastic Mr. Fox and Moonrise Kingdom. Its tone is, for lack of a better word, decidedly quirky, reveling in its weirdness with a smile and a wink. But with all that entertaining goofiness, the show doesn’t let us sit with its heart enough to leave a major impact on the audience.

The Playlist: Halloween

If, for some absolutely ridiculous reason, your October 31st plans don’t revolve around drunkenly attempting to fight at least one of the two ghosts who haunt St Andrews Cathedral, then firstly: you’re doing Halloween wrong. Secondly, you could probably use a few spooky tunes to rattle your bones and get you in the Halloween spirit! As a preliminary disclaimer, I’d like to point out that this playlist does not include Bobby ‘Boris’ Pickett’s ‘Monster Mash’ nor the main theme from Scooby Doo. Apologies in advance, but those are already no-brainers. For a truly thrilling night, check out these bangers that are guaranteed to kill.

The List: Top 5 Stephen King novels

It, directed by Andy Muschietti and adapted from the Stephen King novel of the same name, debuted early last month. As with most adaptations, the movie has rekindled interest both in the source material (published in 1986) and in its author. While It is certainly one of King’s best works, there are plenty of others in his career as a novelist – over sixty books spanning forty years. Don’t know where to start? We’ve got you covered.

The Pillowman: Reviewed

Martin McDonagh’s black comedy ‘The Pillowman’ saw the directorial debut of Mermaids regular Miles Hurley. It was the story of Katurian, a fiction writer living in a totalitarian state, brought in for interrogation about the gruesome content of his short stories and their similarities to a number of graphic child murders occurring in his town.

Jumpers for Goalposts: Reviewed

Jumpers for Goalposts by Tom Wells, charts the progress of a five aside team in an LGBT+ amateur football league. Each scene in the play takes place in the changing room after their games, charting their generally disastrous performances on the field along with their personal developments. While primarily a comedy, there are moments of significant pathos as the play discusses the physical assault of one character over his sexuality and portrays another living with HIV.

Recommended Reads: ‘Difficult Women’ by Roxane Gay

In 2014, the American author Roxane Gay jettisoned herself into recognition with her well-written and searing novel Bad Feminist. A self-proclaimed “bad feminist” herself, Gay wrote eloquently about politics, being a woman of colour, and the contradiction of being a feminist while simultaneously loving things that aren’t necessarily in-line with feminist thought (see: Jay-Z’s song lyrics). This year, Gay published a new book of short stories, entitled Difficult Women.

Spark: Reviewed

The Barron’s got a new seating rack and it’s beautiful.
We’re all back to another semester and another packed Barron season but, as in Shrek 2, ’now…it’s sexy!’.