The Pillowman: Reviewed

Martin McDonagh’s black comedy ‘The Pillowman’ saw the directorial debut of Mermaids regular Miles Hurley. It was the story of Katurian, a fiction writer living in a totalitarian state, brought in for interrogation about the gruesome content of his short stories and their similarities to a number of graphic child murders occurring in his town.

Jumpers for Goalposts: Reviewed

Jumpers for Goalposts by Tom Wells, charts the progress of a five aside team in an LGBT+ amateur football league. Each scene in the play takes place in the changing room after their games, charting their generally disastrous performances on the field along with their personal developments. While primarily a comedy, there are moments of significant pathos as the play discusses the physical assault of one character over his sexuality and portrays another living with HIV.

Recommended Reads: ‘Difficult Women’ by Roxane Gay

In 2014, the American author Roxane Gay jettisoned herself into recognition with her well-written and searing novel Bad Feminist. A self-proclaimed “bad feminist” herself, Gay wrote eloquently about politics, being a woman of colour, and the contradiction of being a feminist while simultaneously loving things that aren’t necessarily in-line with feminist thought (see: Jay-Z’s song lyrics). This year, Gay published a new book of short stories, entitled Difficult Women.

Spark: Reviewed

The Barron’s got a new seating rack and it’s beautiful.
We’re all back to another semester and another packed Barron season but, as in Shrek 2, ’now…it’s sexy!’.

The Playlist: Broadway Workout

New academic year, new exercise routine. We’ll all probably end up failing but for now we’ve actually been going to the gym or on a run at least a little bit regularly. Or maybe you kept fit during summer and are starting to descend down the dark hole of essay comfort food. Either way, everyone knows that in order to get going, you need a suitably peppy playlist. And what’s more peppy than a few showtunes? If you’re looking for an upbeat, motivational, and sometimes cringingly happy mix of songs from your favourite musicals, look no further.

St Andrews Theatre: Semester Preview

The first week of this semester is about to come to an end, which means that the St Andrews performing arts semester is about to start. With Spark going up in week 3, I wanted to do a quick preview of the season and figure out what people were interested in. One of the theatre writers, Olli Gilford, wrote this piece below.

On The Rocks: Opportunities to Get Involved

Chances are that you’re laden down with a whole host of freebies and emails from the societies you expressed an interest in at Freshers’ Fayre. Although you may soon realise that your schedule might not allow space for all of them, you won’t want to miss out on being involved in On The Rocks Arts Festival!

Two Gentlemen of Verona: Reviewed

In many ways The Two Gentlemen of Verona is a testing ground for what will become Shakespeare’s toolbox: we have girl dressed as boy (a la Twelfth Night), a set of four lovers (A Midsummer Night’s Dream), and we even have a Friar Laurence (Romeo and Juliet). As a work which showcases these early ideas, there is much to be interested in on an academic level. Like most people in the audience of Director Olli Gilford’s production, I had never seen or read the play, nor did I know much about it outside of a Wikipedia entry read in a bout of ‘Shakespeare Fear’. While Gilford is aware of the play’s problems, setting them out in his director’s note, the production did not do enough to compensate for the problematic text, in spite of two standout performances.

Mirth Control: Reviewed

The coming of a New Year’s On the Rocks can bring with it a host of new events, with more theatre, art and music than you could shake a stick at –but a guaranteed staple has always been the Blind Mirth Sketch Show. Typically, an improv comedy group, once a year during OTR, Blind Mirth turns their talents to sketch comedy writing, bringing their wit to the masses on the Byre main stage. This year’s production, Mirth Control, while funny, lacked some of the charm of previous shows, occasionally over using tired tropes that seemed more suited to the 1970s.