Unicef Symposium x Children in Conflict: Reviewed

Unicef on Campus St Andrews’ 4th Annual Symposium was held in the Byre Theatre Studio this year, and for the first time, Unicef’s Symposium collaborated with On the Rocks, expanding their audience. The Symposium focused on the issue of Children in Conflict and brought in a panel of speakers with a diverse level of expertise on the topic. The speakers included Marc Ellison, a photojournalist working in conflict zones; Laurie Druelle, a representative of HALO Trust, which focuses on Mine Clearance and Awareness in post-confict zones; Jaremey McMullin, a St Andrews IR lecturer researching internal conflict and the process of post-conflict transition; and Daniel Cosgrove, a representative from UNICEF UK based in Glasgow.

The Jazz Café: Reviewed

The Jazz Café, hosted by the Lumsden Club in Sandy’s Bar, as part of the On the Rocks Festival, was a night of both intimate acoustic music and brash, fabulous, big band standards. The packed bar chatted spiritedly throughout, as the venue as a café and not a concert greatly added to the relaxed feel of the evening.

Found: 5 Questions with the Artistic Director

  1. What is FOUND?

Found, most simply, is a dance show. However instead of being on a stage, it happens outside in various locations around town. It’s also not just one dance show, but several – we have over 10 pieces being performed throughout the week. It’s also a bit different because you don’t need to buy a ticket, you just turn up. But we also won’t tell you when or where it’s happening, so it’s up to you to find us! Each performance only lasts about 5 minutes long but together they form the collective work of Found. It’s kind of like, for want of a better word, flash mobs, although think less jazz hands and more contemporary pop-up performances.

The Great Gatsby: Reviewed

The Great Gatsby, with its stunning eloquence, complex characters and mirage of excess, is not ideally suited for stage adaptation. The text of the play relies too heavily upon the poeticism of Nick’s monologues to bridge the gaps between haphazardly strung together key scenes from the book. Therefore, this must have been an incredibly difficult piece for the whole team to have worked with, and the limitations placed upon the actors and director because of the script were evident throughout this production.

Lobes: Reviewed

First off, I hate fairy lights in plays. I have to lay my cards on the table. Deploy them as well as you like, I’m going to sneer at their use anywhere except on the pin-board of your first-year bedroom. Sorry. While we’re on confessions, I want to note that I don’t really know how to review new writing – should I talk about the production or the text? Both?

The Great Gatsby: Preview

If you’ve ever taken an English class, or been to a vaguely themed party in the past few years, chances are you’ve heard of The Great Gatsby. Even this magazine takes its name from a Great Gatsby character. F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel about wealth and love in the roaring 20s is infamous, and St Andrews is seeing its own adaptation coming to the Stage this week. Owl Eyes sat down with the Director, Madison Hauser, to ask a few questions about how to manage a party quite so big.

“Because It’s Different”: A Lobes Preview

According to Oli Savage, it’s a cursed week. His actor was late to rehearsal. The room he walked into was cluttered with scones, tea, and more chairs than you could possibly guess. By his own admissions, his hands are covered in blisters after trying to work on his van over the weekend. But for a man with a curse, Oli Savage is surprisingly chipper. Not surprising, given that he’s got, as far as I’m aware, 2 projects on the go, not to mention being on OTR committee, teching for the Revue, being in a band and running his own theatre company. With that much on, being anything other than chipper is just admitting defeat.

The Post: necessary but passionless

News on President Trump’s slipshod efforts to discredit the media and his own Department of Justice — eerily similar to Nixon’s rabid treatment of the press and his own charges of obstruction of justice — as well as the discussion on workplace gender politics fountaining from the #MeToo movement, currently dominate US headlines. Such a stage set, Steven Spielberg’s The Post is most certainly a necessary film — though one which fails to capitalise on the underlying, long-dormant anger welling from topical issues.

The History Boys: Reviewed

The History Boys is the nation’s favorite play, and I can absolutely understand why. It’s funny, irreverent, ultimately heartwarming, and it provides a positive view of an experience almost every briton has had. I had a teacher like Hector myself, sans-abuse, and I know the positive impact a person like that can have. And this production brought a lot of that emotion that I know too well. But the energy that makes those moments, and this play, special, wasn’t there, and that lethargy, unfortunately, brought the play down from its peak.